Patricia Dearborn - Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage


Although challenging life situations like a job layoff, rising mortgage rates and divorce can damage your ability to continue to make your monthly mortgage payments, you don't have to be hit with an unexpected shift to strain to meet your mortgage obligations. As an example, simply taking on another financial responsibility like a car payment, college tuition or small business loan could put you at risk of defaulting on your home loan.

Lower mortgage choices that hurt

To keep from defaulting on your mortgage, you could work a second job, put in longer hours at your first job or cut back on other expenses. Instead of getting a degree, you could try to make your current educational background help you land work opportunities that you really want.

But, those choices hold you back. They keep you from doing what you really want to do. Taking on a second job and working longer hours at your first job put you under too much stress. Fortunately, there's another option that you could take to reduce your mortgage.

This option is often overlooked when homeowners get into financial hot spots. A reason for that may have to do with the fact that some people buy houses to avoid connecting with others more deeply. That's right. Some people use their house as a hiding place.

If your relationships are good, you may be a prime candidate for this mortgage reducer

There's fallout from this decision. The fallout limits your ability to create rewarding relationships. And you definitely need rewarding relationships to take advantage of the overlooked mortgage reducer. A great place to start trying out this shortcut to a smaller mortgage is with your parents.

Similar to how you may have moved back in with your parents after college when you were trying to pay off your student loans and before you landed your first full-time job, open to the idea of living with your parents again. The difference is that this time you'll ask your parents to move in with you.

Even if your parents are living on a fixed income, they could help pay a portion of the mortgage. Not only may you and your parents grow closer with this arrangement, you'll both have someone to communicate with. Siblings, adult children and friends are other people who could move in with you and split the mortgage.

Tenants reduce mortgages, letting you stay in a good house

Shortcut to a smaller mortgage can also open up for you if you rent out a portion of your house. If your house has three levels, you could rent out the first and second levels to tenants. You'd have to make sure that the rented space meets local housing codes.

But, unlike living with family, you'll have to develop legal leasing contracts with the tenants. Of course, you could enter into legal written agreements with family members too, detailing when rent is due and the types of maintenance that you are responsible for at the property.


Getting a cat, dog or other pets ready for an upcoming move sometimes can be tricky. Fortunately, we're here to help you and your pet enjoy a quick, seamless transition to a new address.

Now, let's take a look at three moving tips that every pet owner needs to know.

1. Prepare Your Pet's Records

If you're moving far away from your current address, you likely will need to find a new veterinarian in the near future. As such, it pays to prepare your pet's records today to avoid potential problems down the line.

Ask your current veterinarian for a copy of your pet's records. By doing so, you'll have these records readily available for your new veterinarian once you reach your new address.

2. Help Your Pet Manage Stress

Moving is stressful, even for a pet. However, there are many simple ways to help your pet alleviate stress throughout the moving process.

For example, keeping your pet away from movers may prove to be exceedingly valuable. If a pet sees familiar furniture and other items leaving your home, he or she may start to feel worried. On the other hand, spending extra time with your pet while movers pick up your belongings may help you pet minimize stress on moving day.

3. Protect Your Pet While Traveling

Keep your pet in a crate while you're driving to your new home – you'll be glad you did. It is unsafe for your pet to roam free in your car, especially if you're going to be on the road for several hours. Conversely, if you keep your pet in a crate, you'll help him or her remain safe for the duration of your journey.

If you are traveling by airplane, ensure your pet has met all necessary airline requirements. In addition, pick up a pet crate and consult with a veterinarian before your flight.

For those who need extra assistance with navigating the moving process, it often helps to work with a real estate agent. In fact, this housing market professional can help you and your pet overcome myriad moving day pitfalls.

A real estate agent can offer expert insights into what it takes to move with a pet. He or she also can provide comprehensive support as you prepare for a move and respond to any moving day concerns or questions that you may have.

Of course, a real estate agent can help you buy or sell a house as well. For homebuyers, a real estate agent can provide details about homes located near dog parks and other pet-friendly venues. Meanwhile, for home sellers, a real estate agent will make it easy to generate plenty of interest in your house so that you can get the best price for it.

Are you and your pet ready to move? Use the aforementioned moving tips, and you and your pet should have no trouble completing a successful relocation.


Hectic mornings can make for messy, disorganized bathrooms. Between the mad dash of getting the kids ready for school and ensuring you look presentable for the office who has time to put the toothpaste or hairspray back nevermind neatly so? If you’re dreaming of a clean, organized space to get ready for the day keep reading for some easy to implement tips. 

Begin your project with a clean slate by tossing out any outdated products or items you simply don’t use. Check how long to keep an item for by the image of an open container with a number followed by a capital m inside of it. This indicates how many months to keep a product for after opening. If you can’t even remember when you bought a product it's safe to assume its time for a replacement.

Take a tip from the minimalists and keep only what you truly use. After all, the less you have the less you will have to dig through to find what you are looking for. Common culprits are hair products, spa-like bath products and piles of towels. If an item is really something you can’t let go of but don’t use often consider moving it to a nearby linen or storage closet.

Once you’ve decided what stays it’s time to put your items away. But before you start shoving everything back into drawers and cabinets take a few minutes to draw up a plan that gives each and every item a “home”. When everything has a dedicated space it belongs in it makes cleanup a breeze, especially on those hectic mornings.

Keep items off the countertops for an uncluttered magazine worthy countertop. Instead, place your families’ go-to items inside the medicine cabinet or top drawers. Try to keep everything in neat organized lines where you won't have to reach behind products to get the one you are looking for. An orderly lineup prevents chaos and products spilling down each time you reach to the back.

Installing clever organizers for small spaces helps to make the most of tiny bathroom spaces. Think more shelves, lazy susans, drawer organizers and roll out trays to get more out of cabinet spaces. A heat tool corral keeps pesky hairdryers and irons neatly organized and at arms-length.

Maximize empty and therefore unused space throughout the room such as over the toilet by installing shelving. You may also consider adding more hooks if you need them to hang up towels and keep them off of the floor.

It may seem like there isn’t any time for keeping an orderly bathroom when you’re just trying to get out the door in the morning. However, with a thorough cleanout and thoughtful organization your bathroom could be even more tidy than you first imagined. It just takes a little time and creativity to make the most of your unique bathroom space. Happy organizing!


Selling your home can conjure up a variety of emotions, ranging from exuberance to sadness. If you associate your home with raising a family or starting a life with your spouse, then putting it on the market can be a bittersweet experience. In addition to the emotional side of things, there's also the stress that inevitably comes with change and uncertainty. Putting your house up for sale raises several fear-based questions in your mind, such as "How long will it take to find a buyer?" On the average, houses remain on the market for a month or two, but it's not unusual for it to take much longer. To complicate matters: If you're in the position of selling your home before you have another one to move into, then your stress level is probably even higher. Although some factors are outside of your control, such as ever-changing market conditions, there are a few ways you can tip the scales in your direction. Pick the Right Real Estate Agent The real estate agent or Realtor you choose can make a big difference in how fast your home sells and the price it ultimately sells for. A seasoned agent can also make the whole experience a lot less stressful by providing regular progress reports and helping you navigate through the various disclosures, inspections, and paperwork that's required. An exceptional real estate pro will also provide you with valuable advice on how to improve the marketability and appearance of your property. Since "time is of the essence" when you put your home up for sale, it's important to get as many qualified prospects walking through your house, as possible. Good salesmanship, competitive pricing, and sharp negotiating skills can also help bring in bonafide offers on your property -- possibly even multiple offers. Stress Reduction Tips For Home Sellers In addition to having the support of a dependable real estate agent, there are also other strategies you can use to maintain your equilibrium.
  1. Make lists of all the things that need to be done, so that you don't wake up in the middle of the night wondering if you forgot to do something important. Staying mentally organized is one of the keys to feeling like you have some control over all the chaos that's going on in your life. Writing things down is also the first step to getting them completed. Keeping track of appointments, documents you need to gather, and professionals to confer with can also help prevent delays, miscommunication, or confusion.
  2. Schedule time for recreation, entertainment, and physical activity. Selling a home can bring with it a lot of ups and downs, so activities like socializing with friends, going for a walk in nature, or meditating can help maintain a positive outlook and a more balanced perspective on things.
Perhaps the most desirable attitude to adopt is to expect the best, but be prepared for temporary setbacks. While it's true that some properties languish on the market for months, countless others have been scooped up by eager buyers in the first week or two on the market. It depends on a lot of factors, including preparation, excellent timing, and a smidgen of good luck!

This Condo in Lowell, MA recently sold for $112,000. This Garden style home was sold by Patricia Dearborn - Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage.


1301 Lawrence St, Lowell, MA 01852

South Lowell

Condo

$109,900
Price
$112,000
Sale Price

4
Rooms
2
Beds
1
Baths
Briarwood Condominiums, this 2 bedroom condo is being sold "As Is". Low condo fee includes heat and hot water. Close to major highways,shopping and parks. A good investment . Call today! All offers will be presented at 6PM on July 4th per request of seller. Please send to pat.dearbprn@nemoves.com

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